August 9 : This Day in Music History Miscellaneous

This Day in Music History
Miscellaneous
August 9

1964 : Bob Dylan and Joan Baez share the stage for the first time, singing "With God On Our Side" at the Newport Folk Festival.

1964 : The crowd of over three thousand at tonight's Rolling Stones gig in Manchester, England, prove hard to control, accidentally breaking the ribs of one policeman and causing another two to faint in the crush.

1967 : At England's National Jazz and Blues Festival in Sunberry, Jerry Lee Lewis is kicked off the stage after the overenthusiastic crowd responds to his set with a near-riot.

1974 : Four members of the jazz-rock group Chase, who'd scored a hit three years earlier with "Get It On," are killed in a plane crash near Jackson, Minnesota, including leader Bill Chase.

1978 : Muddy Waters performs at the Carter White House.
 

1986 : Queen play their last live concert with Freddie Mercury at the Knebworth Park Festival in England. An audience of 120,000 hears them close out with "We Will Rock You/We Are The Champions" and "God Save The Queen".

1991 : The 5th Dimension are awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk Of Fame.
 

1995 : The original members of Kiss play together for the first time since 1980 when Peter Criss and Ace Frehley join the current band to record their MTV Unplugged special, which is later released as the album Kiss Unplugged. Not counting Ace Frehley's 1976 wedding, it also marks the only time the original members performed without makeup. The appearance goes over so well that Criss and Frehley rejoin the band in 1996, replacing Bruce Kulick and Eric Singer. The subsequent tour becomes the top grossing tour that year.

2007 : As the first Phil Spector / Lana Clarkson murder trial winds down, the legal teams visit the famed producer's Alhambra mansion in California to take a look at the scene of the crime.

Texts from calendar.songfacts.com

THIS DAY IN MUSIC HISTORY

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